Publications

The National Board of Trade publishes a number of reports in a wide range of trade related issues. The reports can be downloaded free of charge.

  1. September 2015 | Publications | English

    The Right to Regulate in the Trade Agreement between the EU and Canada

    - and its implications for the Agreement with the USA

    In this report, the National Board of Trade analyses the wording of two CETA articles that are central to an IIA, which have historically been the most frequently featured in investment disputes, namely the articles on "fair and equitable treatment" and "expropriation". These articles are also the ones with the potentially greatest impact on the state's "right to regulate".

  2. May 2015 | Publications | English

    Regulatory Co-operation and Technical Barriers to Trade within Transatlantic Trade and Investment Partnership (TTIP)

     A central question in the current trade negotiations between the EU and the U.S. is that of the regulations and requirements applied for industrial products. These regulations and requirements ensure that crucial policy interests, for example the environmental and human health concerns, are safeguarded. The EU and the U.S. have about the same levels of protection but their regulatory systems have been designed in a completely different ways. This creates unnecessary barriers to trade between the EU and the U.S.. Since both regulatory systems have been developed over a long period of time and are well established, regulatory coherence aspects related to legitimate objectives, such as health and safety, will become the more difficult to agree on.

    At the same time, TTIP offers an opportunity to address the differences in regulations that form disruptive barriers to world trade. The size and influence of the EU and the U.S. mean that agreements reached can influence the regulations of other countries, and thereby reduce the negative effect of differences in regulatory frameworks on international trade.

    This study is also available as a summary report : How TTIP can Address Technical Barriers to Trade - an Introduction

  3. May 2015 | Publications | English

    How TTIP can Address Technical Barriers to Trade

    - an Introduction

    A central question in the current trade negotiations between the EU and the U.S. is that of the regulations and requirements applied for industrial products. These regulations and requirements ensure that crucial policy interests, for example the environmental and human health concerns, are safeguarded. The EU and the U.S. have about the same levels of protection but their regulatory systems have been designed in a completely different ways. This creates unnecessary barriers to trade between the EU and the U.S.. Since both regulatory systems have been developed over a long period of time and are well established, regulatory coherence aspects related to legitimate objectives, such as health and safety, will become the more difficult to agree on.

    At the same time, TTIP offers an opportunity to address the differences in regulations that form disruptive barriers to world trade. The size and influence of the EU and the U.S. mean that agreements reached can influence the regulations of other countries, and thereby reduce the negative effect of differences in regulatory frameworks on international trade.

    This publication is the short version of the report Regulatory Co-operation and Technical Barriers to Trade within Transatlantic Trade and Investment Partnership (TTIP)

  4. May 2015 | Publications | English

    Single Market, Four Freedoms, Sixteen Facts

    – Economic Effects in the EU

    For over 20 years have goods, services, capital and persons been able to move freely across the EU, at least on paper. But how does it work in practice, and how has it affected the European economy? The National Board of Trade has gathered the economic research on the subject.

    The development of the free movements of goods, services, capital and persons since the launch of the single market in the early 1990s, are presented in one chapter each. The study concludes with how this, in turn, has affected European economic integration and growth.

    This report is built upon our underlying literature review Economic Effects of the European Single Market – Review of the Empirical Literature.

  5. May 2015 | Publications | English

    Online Trade, Offline Rules

    A Review of Barriers to e-commerce in the EU

    Claims about the borderless nature of the internet are only true to a certain extent. Statistics on business-to-consumer e-commerce in Europe for example, show that the Digital Single Market is far from being achieved – the EU is still fragmented into 28 online markets.

    In this report, The National Board of Trade maps out legal barriers affecting e-commerce in the EU, providing an inventory of rules, both national and EU-wide, that restrict online trade. It covers traditional forms of e-commerce affected by a fragmented regulatory framework (from consumer rules to VAT). It also draws attention to the lack of adaptation of the current rules on e-commerce with regards especially to recent technological and business developments.

  6. March 2015 | Publications | English

    How Cross-Border Movement of Persons Facilitates Trade

    The Case of Swedish Exports

    The report analyses the relationship between cross-border movement of persons - primarily labour immigration - and foreign trade. The National Board of Trade shows that there is a positive correlation between cross-border movement of persons from a certain country and Swedish exports back to that country. According to the Board's estimates, the hiring of one additional migrant from a certain country is associated with a six per cent average increase of the hiring firm's export of services and a four per cent average increase in its export of goods, to that country.

    The main conclusion of the report is that temporary cross-border movement of persons to Sweden can contribute to increased exports of goods and services. From a trade perspective, further efforts are required to promote this mobility.

  7. March 2015 | Publications | English

    No Transfer, No Production

    – a Report on Cross-border Data Transfers, Global Value Chains, and the Production of Goods

    Goods production rely on data transfers to happen, especially when production is spread out geographically in so called global value chains. The production process is generally already very digitized and will become even more so in the near future, which will lead to even more data transfer needs. Restrictions on cross-border data transfers can affect companies' capacity to produce goods effectively and influence decisions on the production set up.

  8. March 2015 | Publications | English

    Trade Costs of Visas and Work Permits

    A Trade Facilitation Perspective on Movement of Persons

    In a modern trading economy, people need to move across borders, just like goods, services and capital do. Bureaucratic and lengthy procedures for visas and work permits can increase trade costs in companies, delay deliveries, and cause loss of contracts or clients.

    The report maps "typical" costs for obtaining visas and work permits in Sweden, as well as the effects on companies of uncertainty and delays in the application procedures. The report also shows that effects are more pertinent for companies which trade in services, form part of global value chains, and depend on scarce or specialised skills for their production. Furthermore, small companies and new market entrants are often relatively more sensitive to costs and bureaucracy.

  9. September 2014 | Publications | English

    Making Green Trade Happen

    Environmental Goods and Indispensable Services

    In July 2014, the EU and a number of WTO member countries initiated negotiations on how to facilitate global trade regarding products which benefit the environment. So far, the discussion has focused on eliminating tariffs on so-called environmental goods. This study shows that in order to truly facilitate trade in environmental goods, barriers to trade in services need to also be removed. This is because companies selling environmental goods also usually sell a number of services related to such environmental goods. Often, customers demand a package solution that includes both goods and services. The report identifies a number of services indispensable to trade in environmental goods. Examples of such services include installation services, technical testing and user customisation. The report argues that the countries should negotiate about both the liberalisation of trade in environmental goods, as well as trade in services indispensable to environmental goods.

    The report is based on interviews with companies that export and import environmental goods.

  10. May 2014 | Publications | English

    Moving to Sweden

    Obstacles to the Free Movement of EU Citizens

    Citizens of the European Union (EU) have the right to visit, work, study and retire in other member states. The free movement of persons becomes more important for commerce as production assumes a more specialized and internationalized nature. Production can depend on fast access to the skills and expertise of a few specialists, and it should therefore be easy for them to move between production sites and customers in different member states.

National Board of Trade, P.O. Box 6803, SE-113 86 Stockholm. 
Visiting Address: Drottninggatan 89. 
Phone: +46 8 690 48 00     Fax: +46 8 30 67 59

E-mail: kommersk...@kommers.se

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